LATEST NEWS

Electric Vehicles in Nevada

Electric Vehicle Spotlight: A Variety of Electric Vehicle Options are Headed to Nevada

Plug In America

People who drive EVs love their cars. Why? Because owning an electric vehicle is easy and saves drivers money.

First, let’s talk about sticker price. A brand new electric car in Nevada starts as low as $22,400, and cheaper options are on the way. Like all new technology, electric vehicles are becoming more affordable as they become more common. Another benefit of more EVs hitting the roads is that more certified pre-owned and used electric vehicles are becoming available at even lower prices.

But it’s after you buy that the benefits of owning an electric vehicle really start to add up. Electric vehicle drivers never need to pay for oil changes or smog checks. There are no belts to break. Brakes wear more slowly. EVs are low maintenance, and less maintenance means more money in your pocket.

Electric zero-emissions vehicles also save drivers money and time at the fuel pump. EV owners can drive right past the gas station and charge their vehicle at home while they sleep at night, or at work while they’re on the clock. If you compare the cost of electricity to gasoline, driving an EV in Nevada costs about $1.04 per e-gallon

Read More »

Electric Vehicle Spotlight: Curious about EVs? Learn about the benefits of owning an electric vehicle.

Plug In America

People who drive EVs love their cars. Why? Because owning an electric vehicle is easy and saves drivers money.

First, let’s talk about sticker price. A brand new electric car in Nevada starts as low as $22,400, and cheaper options are on the way. Like all new technology, electric vehicles are becoming more affordable as they become more common. Another benefit of more EVs hitting the roads is that more certified pre-owned and used electric vehicles are becoming available at even lower prices.

But it’s after you buy that the benefits of owning an electric vehicle really start to add up. Electric vehicle drivers never need to pay for oil changes or smog checks. There are no belts to break. Brakes wear more slowly. EVs are low maintenance, and less maintenance means more money in your pocket.

Electric zero-emissions vehicles also save drivers money and time at the fuel pump. EV owners can drive right past the gas station and charge their vehicle at home while they sleep at night, or at work while they’re on the clock. If you compare the cost of electricity to gasoline, driving an EV in Nevada costs about $1.04 per e-gallon

Read More »
Fight Climate Change

Electric Vehicle Spotlight: Drive an Electric Vehicle to Fight Climate Change

Plug in America

Transportation is the biggest source of Nevada’s greenhouse gas emissions. Most of this air pollution comes from gas-powered cars, trucks, and buses, making them a top target as we work to fight climate change. According to the 2019 Nevada Statewide Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory and Projections, transportation will be the leading source of climate emissions for decades to come. 

But it doesn’t have to be this way. 

Nevadans can alter this course by adopting Clean Car Standards and driving more electric vehicles. Clean Car Standards include two components that enable states to fight climate change by reducing harmful emissions from passenger vehicles: Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) standards that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and  a Zero-Emission Vehicles (ZEV) program to put more clean electric vehicles on the road.

Read More »
Power Nevada’s economy

Electric Vehicle Spotlight: The EV industry can power Nevada’s economy!

Plug in America

The electric vehicle (EV) industry is bringing a whole new set of high-quality jobs to Nevada. The Tesla Gigafactory near Reno is one example, employing thousands of workers and becoming a major contributor to our state’s economic activity. More EVs lead to more jobs in our state.

“I think there’s a lot of opportunities here in this state for growth in this sector. It only makes sense that we leverage electric technology like EVs to propel us forward,” said Assemblyman Tom Roberts from District 13.

Nevada is also home to lithium deposits, an important material for the batteries found in EVs. This means even more opportunities to diversify the state’s economy. “We see an opportunity in bringing some of the [battery] supply chain into Nevada and helping Nevadans go to work in a new industry,” said Kristopher Sanchez from the Nevada Governor’s Office of Economic Development.

Read More »
Greater clean car standards

Greater clean-car standards vital for Nevada

Las Vegas Sun | Jasmine Vazin

Nevada is on the front lines of the climate crisis with two of the fastest warming cities, Las Vegas and Reno, in the nation.

Each year, extreme heat events — a series of unusually hot days — happen more frequently and for longer in our state. Heat is the single deadliest climate-related disaster in our nation, and the heat waves we’re experiencing here at home are a direct threat to the safety and security of Nevadans — now and for decades to come.

The impacts of climate change are being felt right now, especially by our most vulnerable. Our neighborhoods are getting hotter and more unbearable, and a history of oppressive redlining, loan blocking, and lack of resources from local governments has left communities of color — with more pavement and less trees than white neighborhoods — hit by the urban island heat effect the hardest. If we don’t act, intertwining social and environmental crises will continue to exacerbate existing inequities and hurt Nevadans.

Read More »
communities at higher risk

Nevadans have a real opportunity to make a difference for clean air

The Nevada Independent | Bernadette Longo

The heat wave we are experiencing here in Nevada is not just uncomfortable; it’s also part of a dangerous trend that we often overlook in our day-to-day lives. Scientific studies have confirmed the Earth’s climate is changing. Many observable changes are a result of the increased greenhouse gases emitted from human activities. Extreme weather events such as heatwaves are likely to become more frequent or more intense. The increased drought in the southwestern United States is placing our communities at higher risk for wildfires. But what do heat waves and wildfires have to do with health? The answer — it exacerbates pollution in the air we breathe.  

Read More »

SOCIAL MEDIA